The Fundamental Constant of Sociology – Taki’s Magazine – Taki’s Magazine – Steve Sailer

January 10, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

With the perennial race-IQ controversy back in the news, due to The New York Times 

attempting to put the boot in on 90-year-old Nobelist James D. Watson from the left and Nassim Nicholas Taleb thundering on against IQ from the right, it’s worth calling attention to one of the most elegant statistical essayists of the 21st century, La Griffe du Lion.

La Griffe, the Zorro of statisticians, wields Occam’s razor with aplomb unique in recent decades. He is a thinker comparable in significance to Taleb, even though their approaches are 180 degrees opposite.

Source: The Fundamental Constant of Sociology – Taki’s Magazine – Taki’s Magazine

Another Moral Panic about Race: James Watson Again Excoriated for His Belief in a Genetic Basis for Race Differences in IQ – The Occidental Observer

January 3, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Editor’s note: I have posted two articles on the controversies surrounding Nicholas Wade and James Watson, both from 2014. Watson is in the news once again because he reaffirmed his belief in the genetic basis of Black-White IQ differences, resulting (of course) in a scathing article in the New York Times by one Amy Harmon. The article notes that despite apologizing “publicly” and “unreservedly,” Watson was forced to retire from his research position, resulting in a drastic loss of income. Since then, he “has been largely absent from the public eye. His speaking invitations evaporated. In 2014, he became the first living Nobelist to sell his medal, citing a depleted income from having been designated a “nonperson.’’

Source: Another Moral Panic about Race: James Watson Again Excoriated for His Belief in a Genetic Basis for Race Differences in IQ – The Occidental Observer

The Global Bell Curve – American Renaissance

March 18, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Why are some countries rich and others poor? Why are some pleasant and well-run while others are pestholes? This question has attracted attention since at least the mid-18th century, when Montesquieu noted in De L’Esprit des Lois that rich countries were in the temperate zones and poor countries were in the tropics.

In earlier times it was common for the people of better-favored nations to assume that if a country was poor it was because its inhabitants were inferior. Mid-way through the 20th century, straightforward thinking of this kind fell out of fashion, in favor of complicated economic and even psychological theories of development. IQ and the Wealth of Nations marks a return to a simpler, more realistic view: that populations differ in average mental ability, and economic achievement reflects these abilities.

Source: The Global Bell Curve – American Renaissance


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